sculpture     

Artist Statement

Cecily Clark

There is something elemental and uncomplicated about working with clay which is just a form of earth but can be shaped in to an almost infinite number of forms. Working in three dimensions seems natural to me. I might start with an idea, but sometimes the hand and the eye take over from the mind and the result can be a surprise. The trick is to see it or its potential.

Most of my sculptures are not realistic although I try to capture the characteristic motion and/or posture of animals or persons in my work. In some pieces contours, angles and plains dominate. I tend toward caricature, and the retelling of myths or tales.

I had six years of sculpture classes at Concord Academy and then by great luck, Leonard Baskin taught a semester of sculpture while I was at Smith. I continued study at The Museum School and the de Cordova Museum.

I have studied life sculpture and portrait head with Pamela Blotner and Harriet Diamond at Snow Farm (previously Horizons), Christopher Growel at the Manchester Institute and at Sanctuary Arts, and Bill Osmundsen at the Studio on the Ridge.

My work has been exhibited in New England shows and galleries including the New Era Gallery in Vinalhaven, Maine, and the Azure Rising Gallery in South Wolfeboro.

My studio is open to visitors by appointment.

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Chris Lomas

I made my first mobile in 1973. Everything was Calder for me. I must have made a thousand just like his. Sometime after my daughter was born the dolphin was born for her. Since then I have tried to make my own designs I think it's difficult to determine what is original. The process of putting them together is always a combination of precise planning and complete surprise. I hope you can enjoy them as I do.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Garland, Ketchum, and Merritt

The Creation of this Print
This unique hand-pulled print is the result of a collaboration of New Hampshire printmakers: Anne Garland, Wendy Ketchum, and Peggy Merritt. Each artist created three original prints, then handed them off to the next artist to add her own imprints, who in turn passed them on to the third artist to complete the final images. To represent the diversity of techniques in the printmaking medium, the group agreed to use a different method on each successive “generation” of prints. The images produced by this collaboration are single cohesive works of art that contain the unique signature of each individual artist.

sculpture     

Artist Statement

Peter Thibeault

This area of my work concerns my long time preoccupation with flea markets and junk stores. During college and early thereafter I began scouring these places of discarded ephemera and began to notice certain recurring themes. The broken remnants of toys and games immediately attracted me. I began to collect these wooden and metal parts, I had nothing specific in mind; it was just the patina, texture and affordability that initially appealed to me.

After a particularly fruitful summer in 1990, I spread my winnings out on my worktable and I began to organize them according to shape, size and color. Seeing them laid out in this way led to tiling the parts onto various surfaces of the furniture that I was building. Those seeds planted years ago led to the work you see here today.

The formal aspects of the work celebrate the graphic richness of material and the articulation of past handwork; qualities that have been slowly replaced by plastic, bland color and shoddy workmanship.

painters     

Artist Statement

John Lloyd

Why do I keep finding my self returning to paint in the landscape? Through the relaxed rhythm of the brush strokes I make a connection to the stories happening around me, the slow movements of the clouds, the rhythm of the water, the gestures of the wind moving though the trees, the many varieties of the movements made by the animals and the people around me enjoying their walk.
Since so many of us work indoors we carry a longing for the world beyond the window. We want a feeling of connection to a greater whole beyond the chatter of the cell phones and e-mail. Our time in the landscape can provide a balance to this sense of isolation where we are in an intricately interconnected world. Painting outdoors also balance the sense of constriction that we feel in the modern life — outside we can deeper, experience more space and distance . Modern life with complexities where every decision has to be considered carefully is balanced by the simplicity of the activity of rendering the world I see in front of me.
These are some of the things that go through my mind while painting outside.

painters     

Artist Statement

Jane Talcott

Jane Talcott studied painting at the Art Students League of New York. She works from direct observation of her subject driven by an emotional response to color. Rooted by a childhood spent exploring nature outdoors, she finds inspiration in open spaces near home in Brooklyn, New York. Jane was born in Hartford, CT in 1959 into a family of artists. After graduation from the Rhode Island School of Design with a degree in textile design she moved to New York and began painting while working as a woven textile designer. She has exhibited in galleries throughout the Northeast including the Allen Sheppard Gallery, Microcosm, Synchronicity Fine Arts, the Gowanus Arts Exchange, and the Flat Iron Gallery. In 2003, she received the Synchronicity Fine Arts 14th Annual Jury Award. Her work is included in private collections throughout the US.

painters     

Artist Statement

Tom Pirozzoli

When I moved to Boston in the early 1970s, the MFA and Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum became my second homes. Art books were devoured; countless sketchbooks and canvases filled. For the next 10 years, travels brought me to Europe, South America, India and East Asia. This visual feast became a journal in watercolor, pen and ink.

Yet travels have always steered me home to my New England roots. The irresistible lure of its distinctive landscape, the elegant simplicity of its architecture and interiors have captivated me for the past 30 years.

While my work as a professional musician has enriched my life, I have never stopped painting. My oils reflect the beauty and purity of all that surrounds me … pull up a good armchair and enjoy!

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Amy Chase

Glass, on whatever scale, has always fascinated me…its history, malleability, fragility, transparency, textures, designs, process, and magic. Glass beads themselves have been a part of virtually every culture throughout the world, dating back at least 40,000 years ago. The process I use to make glass beads is called lampwork, a centuries-old process that originally used an oil lamp to melt and work the glass. In my Walpole, New Hampshire studio, I create my beads using a high-temperature propane torch and rods of imported colored glass from Murano, Italy. These 1.25”-1.5” discs are formed with at least 8 layers of hand- pulled and designed glass to create the concentric rings. The beads are then annealed in a 960° kiln to help make them strong and shatter-resistant. With an array of colored glass to choose from, my designs are constantly changing, and best of all, each piece is unique.
Ever since I can remember, I’ve loved creating with my hands and spending time outdoors. Now those two passions have truly come together. The natural world has always mesmerized me, especially the colors, shapes, and textures of flora and fauna, influencing everything I create. I realize that, whenever I want to study color, all I need to do is walk outside and look closely at the flowers, trees, birds, and mammals I find there. They are my inspiration. Working with the medium of glass also keeps a sense of wonder alive in me. Through trial, error and success, I’ve learned to read the glass, feel the glass, and listen to the glass. It’s a forever journey which I embrace!
I’ve long loved and admired the work of the phenomenal glass artist Dale Chihuly, and I think he said it best when stating, “Glass has the ability, more than any other material, to bring joy and a certain happiness to people.” Creating these pieces certainly brings me joy and happiness, and I hope they will do the same for others.

Artist Statement

Carega, Clark and White Bags

We are excited to offer Carega, Clark and White Bags this summer of 2017. A collaborative effort between bag master, Katy Clark, artist CC White and gallery owner Patricia Carega, the Carega, Clark and White Bags are both elegant and functional. These bags go where ever you go. Travel in style to the airport, to the dock, to the highway or to the town. Paintings by CC White make each bag unique. The official gallery opening is May 27 and all bags pictured on this site are for sale. (They may also be purchased without artwork.) Call the gallery at 603 284 7728 or email patricialaddcaregagallery.com for more information or to purchase.

Artist Statement

The bag that goes anywhere

New Carega, Clark and White Bags available now. A collaborative effort between bag master, Katy Clark, artist CC White and gallery owner Patricia Carega, the Carega, Clark and White Bag is both elegant and functional. These bags go where ever you go. Travel in style to the airport, to the dock, to the highway or to the town. Paintings by CC White make each bag unique. Though we are closed for the season all bags pictured on this site are for sale. (They may also be purchased without artwork.) Call the gallery at 603 284 7728 or email patricialaddcaregagallery.com for more information or to purchase.

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Carega, Clark and White Bags

Carega, Clark and White Bags are the result of a three-way collaboration between Katy Clark, bag master, CC White, abstract artist and Patricia Carega, gallery owner. Combining elegance and style with functionality these bags can travel wherever you go. They will be for sale this summer at Patricia Ladd Carega Gallery in Center Sandwich, but why wait? The bags can be seen on line at www.patricialaddcarega.com or at patricialaddcaregagallery.wordpress.com. Order a bag now and travel, shop or sightsee in style throughout the year. Bags come in different styles, canvases, and colors. The paintings by CC White are one of a kind making each bag original and unique. Bags may also be ordered without artwork.
For more information or to order a bag, email patricialaddcaregagallery@gmail.com or call 603 284 7728. You can also find us on Facebook at the gallery’s page.

Our collaboration began after a morning at Farmer’s market in Sandwich this fall. Katy Clark arrived with her newest collection to sell at Christmas time. At the next table Patricia Carega was selling small paintings by long time gallery artist, CC White. What would one of CC White’s paintings look like on a Katy Clark bag? We loved the result and are pleased to be able to present the most recent bags on the gallery website. Both Katy and CC are continually working on new creations. Bags may also be custom ordered.

A Carega, Clark and White bag “is a bag for a lifetime!” (Karin Beij)

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Henrieke Strecker

Remaining in one place, emerging from the usual all-day mad rush, which has no chance, no hope of arrival, allows a perception to emerge: what actually happened will appear again. Tales will step from this rush --- gestures that are in danger of being drowned by this quickness, almost covered by it.
My intention is not to document an isolated moment or paint a realistic picture like a report. Rather, I want to give an account of small movements and atmospheres, and share what I have experienced within that time.
My desire is for the observer to get in touch with the images, to try to follow their history --- and perhaps invite a new, very personal history. After the first impression has been made and buried in files or drawers, and the original tale is no longer available, the observer may discover new gestures showing through, because the image is, in fact, still living, breathing, and happening. The observer may trust in his or her own perception and immerse in a dialogue with the tale in the present.
The deeper I immerse myself in my work, which means to go deeper within myself, the deeper I move into the unknown. To travel deeper into my work process is like traveling on a white map. Every step is a new mark on that map; it‘s like drawing on a blank sheet of paper, and line by line it will become a drawing.
Most of my images have no titles. I want observers to get in touch with the images so that they will find their own story. I would never name a breath. My wish is that my images are still breathing even though the processes of exposure and developing are done.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Valerie Vermeulen

My work is intuitive. Color, abstraction, line, shape, and minimalism are always part of my process regardless of genre. My compositions are absolutely inspired by my love for natural beauty and the beauty which lives inside of me. – The silent landscape of rural, NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND is endlessly inspiring to me. A visual moment, I hope the work speaks for itself. I hope my work engages the viewer in the pleasures of seeing, and the importance of what seeing is to our human nature.

Artist Statement

Laura Marconi

During the past two years I was fortunate to be able to spend some time in artists residencies in Iceland. In September 2013 I went to GULLKISTAN, in the southwest part of the island where I stayed for one month at the village of Laugarvatn. I was so mesmerized by the savage beauty of Iceland that I applied again for another residency, LISTHUS, this time in the small fishing village of Ólafsfjörður in the northeast, at the mouth of the fjord Eyjafjörður. I was there for one month in August, and for two weeks I went back to GULLKISTAN. This year I will at LISTHUS in August and September.
There are no words to describe Iceland! Its landscape is so dramatically beautiful, this land is alive, and continually changing and somehow destroying and rebuilding itself. It takes your breath away. It grabs you, and guides you toward the deepest part of your soul. It is a spiritual experience.
My inspiration for these group of paintings came from the mountains surrounding Ólafsfjörður. A majestic range still cover with spots of snow forming different shapes. Strong graphic patterns that seemed black and white at a certain time of day. It reminded me of woodcuts prints, very bold looking.
The "Magic Lake" is a small glacial lake that I found after a two hours steep trail on a mountain. A vision of pure ecstasy.

Artist Statement

Ronnie Gould

My work emanates from a background in drawing and painting but mostly as an observer of the world. I rely on visual information such as how people and animals move, their body gestures and expressions to create my sculptures. Every animal has it’s own personality and my goal is to highlight these traits.

My selection of animals is always expanding including both domestic and exotic. All of my animals are individually hand-built in stoneware. The finish firing varies from raku, smoke, or saggar over colored slips and stains.

By manipulating the firings I influence the desired results, but the lick of the flame and smoke leave their own signature. Just as animals have their own personalities, the firing process adds unique and exciting traits to the sculptures.

painters     

Artist Statement

Kasey Keeler

The images I make, inspired by the landscape of central Wyoming, are not simply accurate records of a specific geographic location. The act of painting with wax—a slow, methodical, contemplative process—also encourages me to uncover and interpret the qualities that are the true bones of a place: Stories. Traditions. Ideas. Connections. Such varied influences often accumulate to create a tangled mess of information that at first is hard for me to decipher. It is harder still to decide what kind of imagery might be the most concise way to represent all of the subtle complexities of a place. Working in the studio allows the ideas to mix, sort, condense, and eventually to distill into something pure. Consequently, the end results of this process of looking, thinking and painting are often quite minimal and abstract.

Years ago I read a short article on the painter Agnes Martin that described her typical day and made a beautiful analogy between the quiet thoughtfulness of her paintings and the near monastic-like quality of her life and studio practice. Early to rise, several hours in the studio, a short walk to eat lunch at her favorite small diner (always the same order and always with a glass of water), back to the studio to sit and look and think about the work she had done that morning, early to bed. Similarly, I think, read, walk and look out the window as much as I paint. These activities are the tools I use to both decide what to make and how to understand it once it has been finished.

Artist Statement

Anne Garland

My art is a personal response to the natural world, where I have always found nourishment, inspiration, and joy. I use drawing, painting, and printmaking to visually express my intrigue in all that nature holds, each offering exciting and unique processes, tools and techniques. When painting, the landscape is most often my subject. I love being IN the landscape. The plein air process allows me to inhale all that surrounds me. At the end of a session, even if the painting is not completed, the experience of wading in the river, smelling and standing in the sweet field grasses, or sitting in patterned light of the woods is rewarding. When working in the studio, I am able to recall the landscape. Protected from the bugs and rain, I can work larger and longer, but it is not the same as being there. Through printmaking I enjoy exploring subjects that are more intimately seen, things I can manipulate in my hands, or extract from digital images and drawings. It is an exciting medium, offering endless possibilities in interpreting my intrigue with nature. For example, the thin and sensitive lines of an etching can suggest the fragility of a decaying leaf, while the boldness of a woodcut can convey the scuffling form of an armadillo rustling through the underbrush with it’s snout. Whatever medium or process I use, I am interested in letting the image evolve, becoming something unplanned and surprising in the process of trial, error, and patience.

Anne Garland's work is found in the following public collections: The New York Public Library, University of New England, The Portland Museum of Art, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Colby College Art Gallery, and The Farnsworth Museum of Art.
For the year 2010 she has earned The Pace House Residency in Stonington, ME awarded by the Maine College of Art, and she is the Buffalo National River Artist in Residence, Harrison, Arizona.
Her work is also contained in numerous private collections.

painters     

Artist Statement

Brian Herrick

I am an artist interested in painting, drawing, and writing. The result is

that I am an artist of varied mediums. I am drawn in by the narrative and

aesthetics of graphic storytelling, the process of painting, and the everyday

practice of drawing.

No matter what medium I work in, my work is process based. I look for

surprise. I search for the unexpected which will allow me to proceed. I find

the balance between chance and choice and argue with them both until the

work defines itself.

painters     

Artist Statement

Philip Brown Parsons

Philip Brown Parsons’ work reminds us of why we love and live in the Lakes Region. A gifted hand, a gentle stroke, a peaceful mind, and a sense of the outdoors give his drawings an endearing and nostalgic quality. One wants to spend time with Parsons’ work, to tarry in its presence, and to absorb his mastery.

Parsons was not one to draw every brick but there is texture, depth and detail in all of his work. He was a master of pencil, ink and watercolor, sketching on any available nearby paper, perhaps a piece of cardboard, an old greeting card or a paper bag. He also did works in oil and pastels, often using mixed media. In his portfolio, the roads and farmhouses are familiar. The birds, horses and pets might be our own.

Philip Brown Parsons was a vibrant member of the mid century art scene in Boston and Lexington, MA. He was an illustrator for Houghton Mifflin, and Little Brown. His drawings appeared on the covers of many sporting magazines and LL Bean catalogs. For the last 200 years, Parsons’ family has had strong ties to Lake Winnipesaukee and to Center Sandwich. Out in the early morning with his sketchbook, he drew many of the works presented here on the walls of the gallery.

Artist Statement

Philip Parsons


Philip Parsons (1896 -1977). This fall I have had the great pleasure of spending time with Philip Parsons, Jr. talking about his father’s work and pouring over watercolors, sketches, drawings, prints, pastels, oil painting and most any technique that rendered itself available during Parsons Sr.’s lifetime. Parsons hand was rarely still. His sketches are found on the backs of Christmas cards, snippets of paper and anything else available. The work is charming, contemporary and exquisitely rendered. We look forward to this exhibit and hearing Phil Jr. talk about his father.

Artist Statement

Philip Parsons


Philip Parsons (1896 -1977). This fall I have had the great pleasure of spending time with Philip Parsons, Jr. talking about his father’s work and pouring over watercolors, sketches, drawings, prints, pastels, oil painting and most any technique that rendered itself available during Parsons Sr.’s lifetime. Parsons hand was rarely still. His sketches are found on the backs of Christmas cards, snippets of paper and anything else available. The work is charming, contemporary and exquisitely rendered. We look forward to this exhibit and hearing Phil Jr. talk about his father.

Artist Statement

Philip Parsons


Philip Parsons (1896 -1977). This fall I have had the great pleasure of spending time with Philip Parsons, Jr. talking about his father’s work and pouring over watercolors, sketches, drawings, prints, pastels, oil painting and most any technique that rendered itself available during Parsons Sr.’s lifetime. Parsons hand was rarely still. His sketches are found on the backs of Christmas cards, snippets of paper and anything else available. The work is charming, contemporary and exquisitely rendered. We look forward to this exhibit and hearing Phil Jr. talk about his father.

Artist Statement

Philip Parsons


Philip Parsons (1896 -1977). This fall I have had the great pleasure of spending time with Philip Parsons, Jr. talking about his father’s work and pouring over watercolors, sketches, drawings, prints, pastels, oil painting and most any technique that rendered itself available during Parsons Sr.’s lifetime. Parsons hand was rarely still. His sketches are found on the backs of Christmas cards, snippets of paper and anything else available. The work is charming, contemporary and exquisitely rendered. We look forward to this exhibit and hearing Phil Jr. talk about his father.

Artist Statement

Ronnie Gould

My work emanates from a background in drawing and painting but mostly as an observer of the world. I rely on visual information such as how people and animals move, their body gestures and expressions to create my sculptures. Every animal has it’s own personality and my goal is to highlight these traits.

My selection of animals is always expanding including both domestic and exotic. All of my animals are individually hand-built in stoneware. The finish firing varies from raku, smoke, or saggar over colored slips and stains.

By manipulating the firings I influence the desired results, but the lick of the flame and smoke leave their own signature. Just as animals have their own personalities, the firing process adds unique and exciting traits to the sculptures.

Artist Statement

Gay Freeborn, Chevron

As a painter I have been searching, as we all do, for that which touches my heart. I have painted all of my life; from childhood horses, college figure drawing to images of those in distress, sad people, beautiful people, dogs and their people. I began breeding Labrador Retrievers on my farm in Maine and watching them, noticing their curves, their motion and their devotion, finally I have found an urgency to my brushstrokes that were not evident before. Using oils on canvas as my medium, I portray the dog with love for the animal as my driving force. The space that surrounds the subject is as important as the figure itself as they swirl, sit, sleep or stare back at me from the light engulfing them. The Dog, unconditional and unpretentious sits at my feet as I paint and I don't think I could ask for anything more.

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Laura Fuller

Life is change. That is the only reliable certainty. It is constantly and continually progressing and altering. Unexpected and uncertain in outcome, it is certain in process.

Objects are our representatives. 'Living' solid, fruitful, domestic, useful lives: independently functional. These objects, having given two-to-two hundred years of faithful service, became hidden. In drawers, closets, dumps, underground, and in the ocean -- waiting.

Now, newly born, part of a different whole. Suspended to be gazed at, in reverence. In honor of their, and our past lives. The beauty is in years of touch as marked by many hands. The experience portrayed trigger memories, of events and imagined. And of what will become.

painters     

Artist Statement

Rebecca Klementovich

Flying over the Icefalls at Tuckerman’s Ravine Mount Washington
These three oil paintings depict the acclaimed and deadly Tuckerman’s Ravine’s Icefalls, which are located on the top right crest of the Mountain’s edge. During the spring and later winter month’s skiers will ski off the dangerous top ledge of Tuckerman’s where these Icefalls cascade off the mountain. To make a successful jump the Icefalls require skiers to go off cliffs as tall as 25 feet.
The illuminating qualities of the Icefalls are a rare Bahamas blue. During the cold February and March months these Aqua blue Icefalls are in bright contrast to the white snow. Only through many nights of below freezing weather can this area produce this ghostly haunting mix of transparent blue. There are only a few places in the world that can trap this amazing Aqua blue color.
The four painting are 28x36” and one is 36x48”. If you look closely at the work you can see the many layers of oil which show the frozen moss behind the Icefalls, the movement of hidden water flowing behind the ice, and trapped dirt and rock behind the Icefalls. Rebecca Klementovich, one of the abstract painters in the Femme Fatales of the North has spent many years studying these particular Icefalls and has given us a glimpse into its frozen world.


sculpture     

Artist Statement

Kathryn Field

Kathryn Field’s sculptures are in private and public collections throughout the Midwest and New England. The bronze and steel sculptures explore animals, landscapes and the human form. Her most recent work celebrates her interest in painting and sculpture. The painted landscapes in oil, move across the flowing surface of laser cut stainless-steel plates instead of canvas.
The process of creating these sculptures begins with drawings, simplifying landscapes and figurative studies into bold positive and negative patterns. The drawings are then translated into a CAD program and cut on a laser cutting bed. After they are bent, shaped and welded, creating an undulating three-dimensional surface, the oil painting begins. Using these techniques Field has created a 60-foot steel fence, 18-foot tall outdoor public sculptures as well as small intimate sculptures for private homes. Her most recent commission for Russell Sage College is under fabrication and will be complete by October 20, 2016.

painters     

Artist Statement

Jennifer Van Cor

The landscape has always tantalized my senses. The smell and feel of wet grass, the sound of leaves in the wind, the shape of a shadow through a broken limb. And with it all the ever changing color; a universe of color. Each stroke and dip of the brush pushes my senses onto the surface and if I am listening closely and truly, the life of a landscape fills the painting. As my landscapes progress, they become more about the flow of energy, the experience of a lifetime of color, shape and feeling. Poetry has been another way to touch the landscape. Words mix color and senses through imagery that is very much like painting. When the two are combined, I feel I have painted a poem.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Margery Thomas Mueller

I have been working on Yupo paper for about two and a half years. Yupo is plastic, it has no tooth to hold the ink, graphite or any medium without being fixed...and therefore it is constantly movable. The search for how to work on this paper has lead me to work in a manner that is always flexible and uncertain.

Landscape -Fall 2015

Landscape is a metaphor for life inside and out
It is where we walk, view, embrace our daily experiences of existence.
And it is the story of what we belong to intimately

The branches that connect our years, the brambles we work our way through,
while we seek the fantasy we yearn for, where we imagine what we wish for,
where we dream of a vision that haunts us. It is where we stumble through the thicket to scramble to find a path.

I think of this as of the place we dwell individually or as a whole culture, of the human race.
The complexity that confronts our world daily, trying to uncover the dream beyond, that is the thicket I work at on paper.

With India Ink on Yupo the work is totally fluid. There is no rough tooth to hold on to as the paper is plastic. One must wait for it to cure, then fix it with a medium of wax for stability... the metaphor.

I read about prisons in America that hold innocents, black men beaten by society, issues facing women all over the world, attacks on Planned Parenthood, anti-semitism, migrant Europe…

I draw the thickets.

ARTIST'S NEWS: Margery Mueller has been selected as a first round finalist by the curators of the International Emerging Artist Award in Dubai

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Delanie Jenkins

Grounded within a collage aesthetic my work evolves from the intersection of concept and process and often yields unexpected results. A pseudo-scientific sensibility of observation and experimentation overlaid with an industry of repetition offers a formal structure. In the most recent tape explorations, color and perception are explored with watercolor pencil and the unintentional imprint of the hand. Surfaces build with an accumulation of gestures and the visual field experienced at a distance contracts upon approach to reveal an abundance of singular elements.

The history of my work is in installation, site-specific sculpture, and performance with identity and place, language and power, and regeneration and decay as consistent themes. Recent works address the choreography of the hands and the transformational potential of labor; portraiture without traditional subjects and grand landscapes without a horizon; wishful thinking in approaching a child’s hand game as a strategy for disarmament; and social exchange combined with the circulation of currency as a basis for discussion.



sculpture     

Artist Statement

David Hayes

David Hayes was born in Hartford, Connecticut and received an A.B. degree from the University of Notre Dame in 1953 and a M.F.A. degree from Indiana University in 1955 where he studied with David Smith. He has received a post-doctoral Fulbright award and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a recipient of the Logan Prize for Sculpture and an award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He has had over 300 exhibitions and is included in over 100 institutional collections including that of the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2007 was conferred an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree by Albertus Magnus College. He worked in Coventry, Connecticut and died April 9, 2013 of leukemia at the age of 82, four days after his final opening.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Margaret Merritt

The phrase 'images in paper' encompasses all of my artwork as shown in the prints and handmade paper. The fragility of paper reflects, I believe, the ephemeral quality of nature while the sharp lines of intaglio prints reflect the strong patterns of the natural world that surrounds my New Hampshire home.

A chemist for more than 40 years, I retired from the Wellesley College faculty in 2002 to pursue full-time studio work in print and papermaking in my studio in Center Sandwich, New Hampshire.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Clare Winslow

A third-generation artist and regular summer resident of Sandwich NH, Clare has a degree in Fine Art and studied printmaking at the Corcoran College of Art in D.C. Her focus on printmaking allows her to integrate a broad range of artistic interests: drawing, photography, digital imaging, design and painting. Clare’s work has been shown in group and solo exhibitions at the Washington Printmaker’s Gallery, the Corcoran Museum of Art, and Civilian Art Projects in Washington, D.C, as well as in Houston and Shanghai. Her work has been reflective of the places where she has lived, which include Tokyo, DC, and Los Angeles.

Clare's current body of work is united by the theme of ecology. Whether created with acrylic, silkscreen, or etching press, each piece contains an effort to bring texture to the surface of the print by layering images or marks, to add depth and actively engage the viewer.

According to the artist, "Each project is a challenge for me — finding a delicate balance between process and feeling.”

painters     

Artist Statement

Elizabeth F. Smith

Painting is a meditative experience through which I filter my impressions of the world around me. While my formal art training began at the Museum School in Boston, it is now the natural world and the architecture within it that provide me with lessons and inspiration. I'm fortunate to live in an area that is visually compelling. The mountains and lakes that define the New Hampshire landscape offer endless possibilities for me as an artist.

When thinking about all of the elements that are involved in creating a painting, more than anything else, it is color that motivates and directs my art. I am always searching for the right interplay of hues to evoke a certain mood and response. Color is intuitive, and the decisions I make about it come from trusting that intuition.

I strive to create a sense of natural harmony among rhythm and balance, color and shape. While I always compose a painting with a specific idea and place in mind, it’s the process of putting paint to canvas that ultimately guides the direction that a painting will take. In a sense, the artwork evolves into itself.

painters     

Artist Statement

Kathi Smith


My work reflects places in which I find myself lost in the act of looking. Complicated spaces with an abundance of information intrigue me, and I consider it my task as an artist to find order within them. I look for narratives within the landscape. I find them in backyards, abandoned spaces and in ordinary items left behind for on-lookers to question. I also often find familiarities in spaces that remind me of my home, and sometimes a particular color or light in the landscape evokes childhood memories of past places I visited. I am currently interested in the role of landscapes in developing a sense of one’s self and, when conjured through sensations, how powerful the visual memory of a place can be.

Recently, I have been painting landscapes relevant to my personal history: memories of my family's homestead in Nova Scotia, my hometown in Western Maine, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and Maine’s Great Cranberry Island. Additionally, I have created bodies of work on location at artist residencies in Maine, Connecticut, Virginia, Vermont, and most recently Brittany, France. Each residency has promoted further exploration of my sense of place within varying landscapes and has caused me to think of how particular spaces have influenced my life experience.

Most of my paintings are made from direct observation, while others are built entirely from my memory. Some are a blend of both real and remembered worlds. Each painting serves as a record of my encounter with a place close to me, as well as a direct reflection of my sense of a particular landscape and moment.

Artist Statement

Clare Mowbray

Clare Mowbray lives and works in Holderness, NH. A lover of nature and all beauty that surrounds her on land and in the water, Clare is an amazing photographer. The underwater world shot at White Oak Pond is a breathtaking symphony of light, color and shape. A still, peaceful and almost surreal world entices our gaze as we drift through light dappled flora and fauna. Mowbray describes herself as a mermaid. Her shots of nature under the pond attest to her skill as a photographer and to her love of subject. Prints may be ordered through the gallery.

photography     

Artist Statement

Clare Mowbray

Clare Mowbray lives and works in Holderness, NH. A lover of nature and all beauty that surrounds her on land and in the water, Clare is an amazing photographer. The underwater world shot at White Oak Pond is a breathtaking symphony of light, color and shape. A still, peaceful and almost surreal world entices our gaze as we drift through light dappled flora and fauna. Mowbray describes herself as a mermaid. Her shots of nature under the pond attest to her skill as a photographer and to her love of subject.
All prints exhibited on this website may be ordered. Formats are 11 x 14 inches and 16 x 20 inches. Please contact the gallery at 603 284 7728 or plcarega@gmail.com

painters     

Artist Statement

Wallace B. Millner

After a lifelong interest in art as an avocation, and several years before taking early retirement from a successful business career, B. Millner discovered sculpture. He soon began to exhibit and sell his work.

For the first dozen years of his artistic career, Millner concentrated exclusively on sculpture. He then began to paint in oils, and now divides his time between the two disciplines. His work is collected widely by private and institutional clients.

Artist Statement

Blair Folts

In both of Blair Folts’ bodies of work, "Family and La Famiglia", she is inspired by family life in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. La Famiglia addresses her Italian roots and the passage of her family into the 21st century. Her images of passports, birth certificates and memorabilia are combined with old photographs in layered composition. "…. what happened while we were not paying attention…" uses the same sort of imagery to remember family life in New Hampshire and more subtly the current issues facing our state. Both bodies of work use the process of lithography but because the prints combine many different images and ghost images that are printed 3 and 4 times, the finished product is a monotype. The works are technically intriguing and artistically compelling.

painters     

Artist Statement

Breton Morse

When gas prices are too high and the economy is off, there is little to smile about. Breton Morse’s paintings will awaken your dormant sense of humor and for a few minutes the woes of the world will vanish into Morse’s world of the ridiculous.

Breton Morse, grew up in Washington, DC. He is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. An accomplished painter, his work runs the gammit from realism to modernism. I first met Morse when he came to my gallery one February afternoon in the 1980’s carrying a handful of paintings. His new work had taken a turn that reminded me of a very painterly comic book. The subject matter was silly but hilarious. World War II, restaurant vignettes, dogs, old cars, museums and current topics are all fair game to this artist whose humor creeps onto the canvas as though he can’t help himself. A man of few words, his canvases jump with color and expression. To own one of his paintings is to own a daily smile.

painters     

Artist Statement

Jon Redmond

John Redmond lives and works in West Chester, PA. He holds a BFA from Wes Chester University, a 4 Year Certificate from Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and an MFA from the University of Delaware, Newark, NJ.

His work has been widely exhibited in the Northeast and also on the West Coast. Solo exhibitiions include shows in New York, Delaware, Pennsylvania and San Francisco. Redmond’s work is contained in Museum, Corporate and private collections.

Currently he teaches painting at the University of Delaware.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Mark Stewart

Drawing has been a central part of Mark Stewart’s life from a very early age. In high school his natural gift led him to a drafting class and from there to Architecture while at Texas A&M University. It was there in the mid 70’s that Mark began to paint, experimenting with watercolor technique and closely studying the work of Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth and Edward Hopper. He graduated from A&M in 1975 with a master’s degree in Architecture and a serious commitment to his artistic avocation of watercolor painting.

As a painter, Mark is a realist who is nevertheless intrigued by the mystery behind reality. His subjects, whether human or inanimate, seem imbued with a quiet pensiveness – a patient wait for the thing within the thing to show itself. Mark's watercolor paintings neatly marry an elegant specificity with the shadows of suggestion, in keeping with the soul of reality.

Artist Statement

Sallie Wolf

Sallie Wolf is from Oak Park, Illinois and Sandwich, New Hampshire where she has summered since she was a child. She is a graduate of Brown University, (BA Anthropology, honors, Phi Beta Kappa) and The School of the Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois (BFA). Her landscapes of Squam Lake and the surrounding mountains remind us of the tranquility found in Japanese scenery. Working from sketches made on sight, Wolf combines charcoal drawings with watercolor and other drawing media. The result is soft and rich. Her subject matter is often a multi-sheet panoramic view, though each sheet stands as a painting by itself. The work is sold together or separately but the result is as breathtaking as the landscape it represents. Wolf's work is featured in public and private collections throughout the United States.

My father bought the red house in Center Sandwich, New Hampshire, when I was seven and I have spent almost every summer since looking out at the wonderful view of Squam, or sitting on the beach, staring across the lake at the same mountain ridges, the same boathouse, the same trees. As I sit on the beach I sketch. And at the end of my vacation I take my sketches home to Oak Park, a suburb directly west of Chicago. All of the mixed-media drawings were done in my studio in Oak Park, during the winter, from sketches done on site in New Hampshire. For me they are about distance, dislocation, longing, loss, and memory.

I call these multi-sheet panoramic paintings “Big-Brush Watercolors.” I use the biggest brushes I can find to fill the expanse of paper. Because I work from very small sources—sketches in my journals or quickly painted post cards—I have little detail to work with. This pushes me to rely on my memory and sends the paintings into a level of abstraction that I enjoy. My color choices are influenced by the totally different palette of Chicago in the winter. New Hampshire in the summer is full of blue light, and a deep green. Chicago is gray and cold and a much yellower green.

Lately I have been focusing on consistency in my life and this has spilled over into my studio practice. I show up regularly at the studio on a weekly, near daily basis. Being engaged with my paintings over a long period of time, and not losing touch with them, has given me a sense of ease and fun in the painting that is bringing deeper colors and more playfully worked surfaces. I am eager to see what will happen next.

Artist Statement

Sallie Wolf

Sallie Wolf is from Oak Park, Illinois and Sandwich, New Hampshire where she has summered since she was a child. She is a graduate of Brown University, (BA Anthropology, honors, Phi Beta Kappa) and The School of the Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois (BFA). Her landscapes of Squam Lake and the surrounding mountains remind us of the tranquility found in Japanese scenery. Working from sketches made on sight, Wolf combines charcoal drawings with watercolor and other drawing media. The result is soft and rich. Her subject matter is often a multi-sheet panoramic view, though each sheet stands as a painting by itself. The work is sold together or separately but the result is as breathtaking as the landscape it represents. Wolf's work is featured in public and private collections throughout the United States.

My father bought the red house in Center Sandwich, New Hampshire, when I was seven and I have spent almost every summer since looking out at the wonderful view of Squam, or sitting on the beach, staring across the lake at the same mountain ridges, the same boathouse, the same trees. As I sit on the beach I sketch. And at the end of my vacation I take my sketches home to Oak Park, a suburb directly west of Chicago. All of the mixed-media drawings were done in my studio in Oak Park, during the winter, from sketches done on site in New Hampshire. For me they are about distance, dislocation, longing, loss, and memory.

I call these multi-sheet panoramic paintings “Big-Brush Watercolors.” I use the biggest brushes I can find to fill the expanse of paper. Because I work from very small sources—sketches in my journals or quickly painted post cards—I have little detail to work with. This pushes me to rely on my memory and sends the paintings into a level of abstraction that I enjoy. My color choices are influenced by the totally different palette of Chicago in the winter. New Hampshire in the summer is full of blue light, and a deep green. Chicago is gray and cold and a much yellower green.

Lately I have been focusing on consistency in my life and this has spilled over into my studio practice. I show up regularly at the studio on a weekly, near daily basis. Being engaged with my paintings over a long period of time, and not losing touch with them, has given me a sense of ease and fun in the painting that is bringing deeper colors and more playfully worked surfaces. I am eager to see what will happen next.

photography     

Artist Statement

Robert Hesse

A lifetime as a research scientist has taught me that what is important cannot be reduced to words and numbers. We rely on art for the vital part which cannot be counted or put into words. An artist’s statement, then, is much like a silent film of a concert. We can see the instruments and players but are left to imagine the music. I have been taking pictures for nearly a half century. While some believe that the camera captures reality, I am drawn to the way a camera flattens, isolates, overwhelms with the insignificant, and, like Kokopelli, continually surprises. Gary Winograd supposedly said "I take photographs so that I can see how something looks photographed". That speaks to me. What a camera leaves out can be more important than what it takes in. It clears clutter and visual cacophony revealing the richness, beauty, and magic in the everyday, the ordinary, the overlooked, or abandoned. I sometimes say that my art lies in "curating the monkeys". For every monkey at a typewriter, there is a myriad scattering, arranging, shaping, eroding, occasionally leaving a bit of visual magic. Here a Hopper, there an O'Keeffe, sometimes a Pollock, a Rothko, a Chamberlain. Redoute and Sesshu show up along with the visions of artists unremembered or unborn. Sometimes they leave a scene from a story we're invited to continue, sometimes a half remembered dream, sometimes an empty stage set awaiting the actors, sometimes glyphs in a language we must struggle to learn. I celebrate my camera's help in finding these treasures and revealing them to others. Because I prize the accidental and the unexpected, I try to get my artwork out of the frame (and occasionally off the wall). So, I print on unconventional media ranging from metal plates to filmy silk. I want my work to be touchable, easy to put up, to take down, to rearrange. Sometimes I want it to move with breezes, let light shine through, change with the day. I want it to keep you surprised.

Artist Statement

Robin Dustin

One thing they can’t teach you in undergraduate or graduate art classes is whether you’ll enjoy working and selling in your chosen medium. In my case, I majored in the entire Art Department at Southern Illinois Univ. – Pottery, Weaving, Metalsmithing, Sculpture (including welding), Printmaking, a few Art History courses and even Oil Painting. I did a minor in Education. My mother wanted me to be able ‘earn a living’ if I couldn’t make it as an artist. Both my weaving and metal instructors at SIU were graduates of Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan and encouraged me to do graduate work there. Before going, I spent a summer at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina where I studied Enameling and Lapidary (cutting cabochons and faceted stones) and did more weaving. At Cranbrook I got an MFA in Weaving, with a minor in Metalsmithing.

While living in NYC and getting to ‘the last $10 in the bank,’ I figured I’d better start working with my own two hands. With the addition of a little common sense, all my previous experience of working with tools and materials made it fairly easy to do carpentry, contracting, building, and yes, some teaching for most of my ‘earning’ years. When I first moved to Sandwich in ’78 I set up a shop with a jeweler friend and sold woven items. They sold well enough, but I soon found I really did not like producing items for sale and liked even less doing commissions. At that point I went back to my building skills and worked for a contractor for almost ten years, then became director of the historical society before retiring.

About four or five years ago I found myself driving to Kennett High School in Conway once a month to sit in on the Woodturners meetings. I didn’t have a lathe, but surely did enjoy seeing what others were making on their lathes. After about a year of this and taking a couple of short courses in turning at Kennett, I decided to buy a lathe. That was in the summer of 2004. Several attempts at turning, getting the gouge caught (there’s a reason why they’re called gouges) and scaring the pudding out of myself, I was ready to sell that Delta lathe. It wasn’t until late 2006 that I got some simple instructions from a friend and started my career of woodturning with a half inch scraper. The fellows at the club meetings were impressed when I finally had some pieces to show, even though they made fun of me for using a scraper all the time. I said I didn’t care what tool I used as long as it allowed me to turn wood comfortably. They had to agree. Since then I’ve gained considerable skill with bowl gouges (not skews though) and have upgraded to a larger, heavier lathe (“Puff” the Magic Powermatic Dragon) that allows me to mount a big chunk of wood I’ve chainsawed from my property and start turning it slowly to get it balanced, then make a big bowl, platter or whatever. It’s nice to work in a medium I really appreciate and solve problems from an artistic point of view.

I do wish I had been introduced to the woodturning world much earlier in my life, but I’m here now and I’m happy turning bowls for myself and if someone wants to buy them, that’s great.

painters     

Artist Statement

Kim Case

My paintings feel to me as if they of have always been in process of becoming. At completion they feel eerily like old friends who have finally shown up for a visit. Though I am consciously involved in the physical task of applying layers of paint, it feels more like a reverse experience of peeling away until something is revealed and I think, ‘Oh of course, there you are’.
Like many of us who love a place, certain views and vistas are imprinted on me as firmly as DNA. Each piece is a song of an appreciation that has been passed down through generations. Where water meets land, and land the sky, these are ripe arenas for ancient and fascinating metaphors of transition, contrast, ying, yang, balance and harmony. As such, these tension points are also endless resources for inspiration. It helps that no two days are exactly alike, so each work, even of the same location, is always fresh and immediate. Capturing and interpreting these places is more instinctive than studied, and like drawing since childhood, compulsive. At its best, my art is a meditation, accomplished only when I am able to slip into the stream with the Creativity, letting go while training and heart guide the hand.

Artist Statement

Robin Dustin


Robin Dustin

One thing they can’t teach you in undergraduate or graduate art classes is whether you’ll enjoy working and selling in your chosen medium. In my case, I majored in the entire Art Department at Southern Illinois Univ. – Pottery, Weaving, Metalsmithing, Sculpture (including welding), Printmaking, a few Art History courses and even Oil Painting. I did a minor in Education. My mother wanted me to be able ‘earn a living’ if I couldn’t make it as an artist. Both my weaving and metal instructors at SIU were graduates of Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan and encouraged me to do graduate work there. Before going, I spent a summer at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina where I studied Enameling and Lapidary (cutting cabochons and faceted stones) and did more weaving. At Cranbrook I got an MFA in Weaving, with a minor in Metalsmithing.

While living in NYC and getting to ‘the last $10 in the bank,’ I figured I’d better start working with my own two hands. With the addition of a little common sense, all my previous experience of working with tools and materials made it fairly easy to do carpentry, contracting, building, and yes, some teaching for most of my ‘earning’ years. When I first moved to Sandwich in ’78 I set up a shop with a jeweler friend and sold woven items. They sold well enough, but I soon found I really did not like producing items for sale and liked even less doing commissions. At that point I went back to my building skills and worked for a contractor for almost ten years, then became director of the historical society before retiring.

About four or five years ago I found myself driving to Kennett High School in Conway once a month to sit in on the Woodturners meetings. I didn’t have a lathe, but surely did enjoy seeing what others were making on their lathes. After about a year of this and taking a couple of short courses in turning at Kennett, I decided to buy a lathe. That was in the summer of 2004. Several attempts at turning, getting the gouge caught (there’s a reason why they’re called gouges) and scaring the pudding out of myself, I was ready to sell that Delta lathe. It wasn’t until late 2006 that I got some simple instructions from a friend and started my career of woodturning with a half inch scraper. The fellows at the club meetings were impressed when I finally had some pieces to show, even though they made fun of me for using a scraper all the time. I said I didn’t care what tool I used as long as it allowed me to turn wood comfortably. They had to agree. Since then I’ve gained considerable skill with bowl gouges (not skews though) and have upgraded to a larger, heavier lathe (“Puff” the Magic Powermatic Dragon) that allows me to mount a big chunk of wood I’ve chainsawed from my property and start turning it slowly to get it balanced, then make a big bowl, platter or whatever. It’s nice to work in a medium I really appreciate and solve problems from an artistic point of view.

I do wish I had been introduced to the woodturning world much earlier in my life, but I’m here now and I’m happy turning bowls for myself and if someone wants to buy them, that’s great.

Artist Statement

Alston Conley

Alston Stoney Conley lives and works in Massachusetts and in Maine. Currently he is Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Fine Arts Department at Boston College. A career painter, Conley has taught and lectured in New England and in New York. He has been the recipient of many awards and distinctions for his work. His paintings are contained in both Museum and Corporate collections.

For many years Conley was interested in the fresco technique. Plaster is heavy, hard to move and easily damaged. He turned to painting on board, canvas and paper in oil and watercolor. Landscapes and Waterscapes of Venice, Italy and Maine will be on exhibit at the gallery this summer. These paintings reveal an interest in form and light.

painters     

Artist Statement

Gail Robertson

What I like about being a painter is the process of seeing/becoming empty, and without thinking painting from that place. Have you ever noticed that no one asks a writer to paint about their writing?

Gail Robertson lives and works in Mill Valley, Callifornia. Her work reflects the depth and influences that life in different cultures can stimulate. These paintings are mystical testimony to the Bay Area’s moody climate and to her travels.

painters     

Artist Statement

Blair Folts

Inspired by the power of landscape, I have been drawn to study the natural layers found on the Earth through sketching. This has in turn led to my interest in layering my paintings and prints in order to capture natural and cultural evolution. Landscape holds the power of Nature and the Earth. In traveling to remote places, I have searched for the ancient power of “landscapeness” and how people move and live in that space. The sketchbook is a constant companion and allows me to record impressions often not captured by the camera. Once home in my studio, twigs, dirt and even “squished bugs” from the site have helped me travel back to these lands and have inspired different kinds of layering in my work. Through my work as an environmental activist, I am continually inspired by the power of language and words to effect change, and as such have drawn upon them as form in my work. Incorporating words as texture in printmaking, I have found a way to combine layering to speak about the cultural global divide as societies change and become more homogenized.

Through personal journals, photography, printmaking and painting I seek to depict the issues we are facing today and suggest ways we can make new decisions about how we live. How can we learn to think beyond our own neighborhood? How can we learn to better understand the impact our actions in our own homes have on people thousands of miles away? Can we learn to look at the world from someone else’s perspective?

How can we find our own personal voice and place in a rapidly changing landscape?

painters     

Artist Statement

Wendy Ketchum

Statement for “Telling Stories” Print Series

This series began with an investigation of my Scandinavian roots. In researching ancient Swedish history, I was drawn immediately to the fascinating images that were carved into rock faces during the Bronze Age. These carvings tell stories about prehistoric religion and the human activities that were taking place at that time. Our need to record or map our environments is a uniquely human trait. Beyond simple demarcation, the marks and visual images made by humans in early history are complex and imbued with meaning. Before the age of literacy, ancient peoples were creating pictorial narratives with images and symbols of exploration, migration, hunting/gathering, early agriculture, celestial observations, and religious rituals.

This need to record our environment expanded from rock carvings to early map making with imagined images of unknown territories and monsters. Women wove tapestries as interpretations of oral narratives. (Even before the medieval manuscript tradition, the Old Icelandic word “bok” was translated as “book” and/or “tapestry.” The Latin root for the word “text” is “textus,” which literally means “thing woven.”) Medieval scribes introduced the tradition of illuminated manuscripts, which combined both text and pictures.

I was intrigued by the different ways my ancestors told stories and was inspired to recreate some of these narrative styles, using images taken from Scandinavian rock carvings, early Swedish textiles, ancient maps of Nordic territories, and illustrated manuscripts. I chose to create prints from woodcuts, since it seemed the perfect method to mimic early modes of visual storytelling. These images were printed mostly as bleed prints (without the traditional white margins of the paper exposed), and most were printed in a scroll-like long horizontal format to give the feeling of the print as object.

Artist Statement

Bunnies

My work emanates from a background in drawing and painting but mostly as an observer of the world. I rely on visual information such as how people and animals move, their body gestures and expressions to create my sculptures. Every animal has it’s own personality and my goal is to highlight these traits.

My selection of animals is always expanding including both domestic and exotic. All of my animals are individually hand-built in stoneware. The finish firing varies from raku, smoke, or saggar over colored slips and stains.

By manipulating the firings I influence the desired results, but the lick of the flame and smoke leave their own signature. Just as animals have their own personalities, the firing process adds unique and exciting traits to the sculptures.

Artist Statement

Lisa Houck

Boston artist, Lisa Houck's work is best described in the following article from the Boston Globe by Christine Temin: "Lisa Houck's eye-popping watercolors and oils are flat and densely patterned, with the various sections appearing pieced together, like crazy quilts. Hers is a crowded, cacophonous landscape inhabited by flowers, fish, trees, numbers, raindrops, symbols, and dots like those in aboriginal paintings, all competing for your attention." Houck's landscapes are more about pattern and color than land. Most important to her work is her powerful sense of design.

Houck is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design (BFA) and Tufts University/School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, (MA/MFA). Her work has been extensively exhibited in galleries and museums and she is widely published. Houck's pieces can be found in numerous collections including The Boston Company, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Fidelity Investments, the Fogg Art Museum, Coopers and Lybrand, and Massachusetts General Hospital to mention a few.

painters     

Artist Statement

Alice Morse

Alice Morse lives and works in Spain. She has exhibited her work in Mallorca ,Barcelona and Madrid. In the United States she has shown at galleries in Washington DC, Art Miami and now at Patricia Ladd Carega Gallery. First a student of art in Spain at Artes y Oficios in Mallorca, Morse then studied at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC. in 1982. Returning again to Washington in 1986, she studied at the Washington Art Studio and the Washing Art and Music School. She returned to Mallorca and in 1995 finished her studies at the Escuela de Dieno I.D.E.A. She has been working and living in Spain form most of her career.

Morse's work on first glance takes us back to an era long lost to history. Shapes in plaster remind of bones or fossils cracked with age while lying on backgrounds that could be ancient stones. Her work is about texture, spaces and voids. Morse seeks to capture a reality made up of "the dynamics of the alive and dead, still and flowing, emotional and rational, noisy and silent, light aggression and rest-reflection". Her work is as engaging to the mind as it is to the hand.

"Alice Morse's work resonates with the primitive dream-time of an aboriginal world. She seeks to capture the essence of the beginning of life, the instant of creation." James Rose, BBC Engineer, 2006

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Ronnie Gould

My work emanates from a background in drawing and painting but mostly as an observer of the world. I rely on visual information such as how people and animals move, their body gestures and expressions to create my sculptures. Every animal has it’s own personality and my goal is to highlight these traits.

My selection of animals is always expanding including both domestic and exotic. All of my animals are individually hand-built in stoneware. The finish firing varies from raku, smoke, or saggar over colored slips and stains.

By manipulating the firings I influence the desired results, but the lick of the flame and smoke leave their own signature. Just as animals have their own personalities, the firing process adds unique and exciting traits to the sculptures.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Michael Rich

Michael Rich, graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, (BFA 1991) and the Savannah College of Art and Design, (MFA 1997) is currently a professor of art at Roger Williams University, Bristol, Rhode Island. Time spent around the waters of Nantucket Island and the hills of Cortona, Italy helped to shape a love and interest in landscape and natural rhythms of color that remain very much a focal point in his work today.

A dedicated practitioner of yoga, Rich is influenced greatly by Eastern philosophy and art in an approach to nature and landscape as a wellspring for spiritual investigation and meditation.

“My paintings and drawings of the past decade have explored through the language of abstraction the notion of place. Places once visited, invented or discovered, vaguely take shape in the colors of space and light.

The gray skies of Providence, the expanses of sky and sea surrounding Nantucket Island, the warm of New England Fall, are subjects now mined in my work. In an effort to understand my own place among these fleeting images, I seek a language that draws on personal history as well as the history of painting while forging a new path between abstraction and the realization of the image of place.”

Michael Rich is exhibited in galleries across the country. His work is contained in museum, corporate and private collections.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Anna Jeretic

Anna Jeretic lives and works in the countryside outside of Paris, France. She is a painter and a print maker. Her paintings seem to tell stories as whimsical animals interact with each other or sometimes with humans in charmed settings. The works are soft and invite us into Jeretic's allegorical world.

A trip to Africa inspired Jeretic to paint lions, tigers, elephants and birds that she saw there. These animals are also the subject of a series of etchings she has created. This sensative work narrates the existence of the wonderful creatures found in the wild.

Jeretic has exhibited in Paris and her work is found in private collections in the United States and abroad.

work on paper     

Artist Statement

Margaret Barnaby

Multiple Plate wood block prints by Margaret Barnaby

Margaret Barnaby, a 30- year studio art jeweler, painter, printer and sculptor, exhibits paintings and prints at the Volcano Art Center and Volcano Garden Arts in Volcano, HI, Carega Gallery in Sandwich, NH, and Living Arts Gallery in Hawi, HI. Her monoprints, represented by Pelavin Editions in New York City, are in many corporate collections, including those of United Parcel Service and Texas Instruments.
In 2002 the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts purchased the watercolor ‘Pink and the Inner Child.’ Recent woodblock prints were awarded the John Charlot prize in the 2006 Honolulu Printmakers show, and the Honblue purchase award in 2007. In 2008 the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts purchased “Kink” a multiple plate woodblock print. It is currently on exhibition at the Hawaii State Art Museum in Honolulu, HI.
Her small editions of woodblock prints use both Japanese and western approaches and techniques. Each print requires that at least four plywood plates be hand-carved. The plates are then inked and printed in succession on an etching press.
“The natural world around me has always been the starting point of my work, whether it be jewelry, paintings or prints. My new series of prints uses the ‘alala, endangered Hawaiian crows, as a metaphor for hope and change. I was able to see the birds (of which there are only 67) at the Keauhou Bird Center in Volcano.
Multiple plate woodblock printing satisfies my love of craft and provides a vehicle to experiment with color, composition and content.”


sculpture     

Artist Statement

Madeleine Lord

Massachusetts artist Madeleine Lord gives new life to metal and steel scraps found at her local dump. The transformed pieces become flowers, dogs, fish, birds, clothing and anything her grand imagination can conceive of. To visit her studio is to encounter old refrigerators, stoves and dishwashers awaiting new life. Her blowtorch becomes her pencil. Some of Lord's surfaces remain enameled as they were; others she paints with generous brush strokes and vivid colors. Her work is free standing or can be hung on walls or nestled in corners. Her results are energetic, intriguing, playful and simply ingenious.

An excellent painter, Lord is a graduate of Smith College (BA Studio Art) and The Shawsheen Vocational Technical School where she studied welding. She has exhibited throughout New England and her work is included in many public and private collections. Commissioned pieces can be found throughout the United States.

objects and glass     

Artist Statement

Robin Dustin

One thing they can’t teach you in undergraduate or graduate art classes is whether you’ll enjoy working and selling in your chosen medium. In my case, I majored in the entire Art Department at Southern Illinois Univ. – Pottery, Weaving, Metalsmithing, Sculpture (including welding), Printmaking, a few Art History courses and even Oil Painting. I did a minor in Education. My mother wanted me to be able ‘earn a living’ if I couldn’t make it as an artist. Both my weaving and metal instructors at SIU were graduates of Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan and encouraged me to do graduate work there. Before going, I spent a summer at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina where I studied Enameling and Lapidary (cutting cabochons and faceted stones) and did more weaving. At Cranbrook I got an MFA in Weaving, with a minor in Metalsmithing.

While living in NYC and getting to ‘the last $10 in the bank,’ I figured I’d better start working with my own two hands. With the addition of a little common sense, all my previous experience of working with tools and materials made it fairly easy to do carpentry, contracting, building, and yes, some teaching for most of my ‘earning’ years. When I first moved to Sandwich in ’78 I set up a shop with a jeweler friend and sold woven items. They sold well enough, but I soon found I really did not like producing items for sale and liked even less doing commissions. At that point I went back to my building skills and worked for a contractor for almost ten years, then became director of the historical society before retiring.

About four or five years ago I found myself driving to Kennett High School in Conway once a month to sit in on the Woodturners meetings. I didn’t have a lathe, but surely did enjoy seeing what others were making on their lathes. After about a year of this and taking a couple of short courses in turning at Kennett, I decided to buy a lathe. That was in the summer of 2004. Several attempts at turning, getting the gouge caught (there’s a reason why they’re called gouges) and scaring the pudding out of myself, I was ready to sell that Delta lathe. It wasn’t until late 2006 that I got some simple instructions from a friend and started my career of woodturning with a half inch scraper. The fellows at the club meetings were impressed when I finally had some pieces to show, even though they made fun of me for using a scraper all the time. I said I didn’t care what tool I used as long as it allowed me to turn wood comfortably. They had to agree. Since then I’ve gained considerable skill with bowl gouges (not skews though) and have upgraded to a larger, heavier lathe (“Puff” the Magic Powermatic Dragon) that allows me to mount a big chunk of wood I’ve chainsawed from my property and start turning it slowly to get it balanced, then make a big bowl, platter or whatever. It’s nice to work in a medium I really appreciate and solve problems from an artistic point of view.

I do wish I had been introduced to the woodturning world much earlier in my life, but I’m here now and I’m happy turning bowls for myself and if someone wants to buy them, that’s great.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Sallie Wolf

Sallie Wolf is from Oak Park, Illinois and Sandwich, New Hampshire where she has summered since she was a child. She is a graduate of Brown University, (BA Anthropology, honors, Phi Beta Kappa) and The School of the Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois (BFA). Her landscapes of Squam Lake and the surrounding mountains remind us of the tranquility found in Japanese scenery. Working from sketches made on sight, Wolf combines charcoal drawings with watercolor and other drawing media. The result is soft and rich. Her subject matter is often a multi-sheet panoramic view, though each sheet stands as a painting by itself. The work is sold together or separately but the result is as breathtaking as the landscape it represents. Wolf's work is featured in public and private collections throughout the United States.

My father bought the red house in Center Sandwich, New Hampshire, when I was seven and I have spent almost every summer since looking out at the wonderful view of Squam, or sitting on the beach, staring across the lake at the same mountain ridges, the same boathouse, the same trees. As I sit on the beach I sketch. And at the end of my vacation I take my sketches home to Oak Park, a suburb directly west of Chicago. All of the mixed-media drawings were done in my studio in Oak Park, during the winter, from sketches done on site in New Hampshire. For me they are about distance, dislocation, longing, loss, and memory.

I call these multi-sheet panoramic paintings “Big-Brush Watercolors.” I use the biggest brushes I can find to fill the expanse of paper. Because I work from very small sources—sketches in my journals or quickly painted post cards—I have little detail to work with. This pushes me to rely on my memory and sends the paintings into a level of abstraction that I enjoy. My color choices are influenced by the totally different palette of Chicago in the winter. New Hampshire in the summer is full of blue light, and a deep green. Chicago is gray and cold and a much yellower green.

Lately I have been focusing on consistency in my life and this has spilled over into my studio practice. I show up regularly at the studio on a weekly, near daily basis. Being engaged with my paintings over a long period of time, and not losing touch with them, has given me a sense of ease and fun in the painting that is bringing deeper colors and more playfully worked surfaces. I am eager to see what will happen next.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

CC White


The majority of my work mirrors the pull between heart and mind. I use marks, color and form to translate emotion into abstract image, hoping to provoke a strong reaction in the viewer. I am led into a painting by curiosity and/or strong feelings about things I care deeply about. Some of these catalysts that propel me to paint are the devastation of our environment, women’s issues, dream images or even a particularly intriguing dream sequence. Before I start a painting, I try to let go of expectations and plans, and allow intuition to guide me

Most of my work is mixed media on paper. “Mixed media” includes acrylics, inks, graphite, conté and oil crayon, watercolor and collage. I also like to make assemblages of found objects in both two- and three-dimensions.

Painting is sacred work for me, but at the same time I try not to take myself too seriously. I love to make things. I am better with my hands than with words.

painters     

Artist Statement

Elizabeth Nelson

Vermont artist, Elizabeth Nelson, is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design (BS) and the University of North Carolina (MA) at Chapel HIll. Her paintings have been exhibited throughout the United States with a concentration on New England. She as been the recipient of numerous awards for her painting and her work is in both public and private collections.

Currently Nelson uses one or more photographs that are applied to her canvas. She then paints the continuation of the scene she has photographed. At first glance the viewer doesn't realize that the photograph is a part of the painting. On closer look the photograph becomes more obvious and the viewer is amazed at the artist's ingenuity and talent. Nelson has discovered another version of deception in art. Her brush stokes are confident and color identical to those captured by the lens.

painters     

Artist Statement

Laura Marconi

Art to me is an expression of an inner world. It is a search with endless questions of life's mysteries. And with new answers there are new questions, and a new personal growth. It is a difficult and challenging task.

My work is personal and intimate. I tried to capture the moment in time and my feelings.

I look for ordinary elements and I stretch them; the use of lines and colors reflects my inner thoughts. I like to have a sense of space in my paintings, to me it symbolizes human nature. Mystery is also important, it leads to more open interpretations.

During the past two years I was fortunate to be able to spend some time in artists residencies in Iceland. In September 2013 I went to GULLKISTAN, in the southwest part of the island where I stayed for one month at the village of Laugarvatn. I was so mesmerized by the savage beauty of Iceland that I applied again for another residency, LISTHUS, this time in the small fishing village of Ólafsfjörður in the northeast, at the mouth of the fjord Eyjafjörður. I was there for one month in August, and for two weeks I went back to GULLKISTAN. This year I will be at LISTHUS in August and September.
There are no words to describe Iceland! Its landscape is so dramatically beautiful, this land is alive, and continually changing and somehow destroying and rebuilding itself. It takes your breath away. It grabs you, and guides you toward the deepest part of your soul. It is a spiritual experience.
My inspiration for these groups of paintings came from the mountains surrounding Ólafsfjörður. A majestic range still covered with spots of snow forming different shapes. Strong graphic patterns that seemed black and white at a certain time of day. It reminded me of woodcuts prints, very bold looking.
The "Magic Lake" is a small glacial lake that I found after a two hours steep trail on a mountain. A vision of pure ecstasy.

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Lise Lemeland

My work comes from an ongoing fascination with pattern in its many forms and related theoretical discourses. I am captivated by the worlds of color and pattern revealed in the decorative arts from other cultures. Indian, Turkish, South and Central American carpets provide the structural foundation for the paintings. European lace, embroidery and Japanese kimonos are some of the sources of imagery and repetitive motifs, and have become an integral part of the patterning in my most recent work. In a broader sense, my painting is a response to certain preconceptions about decoration. By using overtly ornamental designs, I am embracing the decorative, making it both content and form.

Many of my paintings have animal elements such as snakes and dragons that construct another layer of pattern. The dragon drifts in and out of art and mythology of the past and present like a recurring dream. It has enormous power as a symbol and yet stays nebulous in form and in meaning. Dragons of the West are with few exceptions evil, hideous creatures symbolic of spiritual desolation and the dark side. Eastern dragons are the complete antithesis: benevolent, elegant, revered demi-gods symbolic of spiritual or meteorological import and often immortality. In China, the dragon originates from a matriarchal society and is closely associated with the serpent. While it is moody and unpredictable, it also represents creation; and in both eastern and western cultures it is tied to knowledge and wisdom. The dragon in my paintings is a metaphor for this duality of spirit. It is self-referential, symbolizing the internal and external conflicts of being human.

By combining and recontextualizing these various images, lace, and textile patterns, my intent is to generate new meaning. At its heart, this work is about beauty and embracing decoration. It is about visual splendor and the celebration of pattern and color.

http://www.liselemelland.com/

painters      work on paper     

Artist Statement

Lisa Houck

Boston artist, Lisa Houck's work is best described in the following article from the Boston Globe by Christine Temin: "Lisa Houck's eye-popping watercolors and oils are flat and densely patterned, with the various sections appearing pieced together, like crazy quilts. Hers is a crowded, cacophonous landscape inhabited by flowers, fish, trees, numbers, raindrops, symbols, and dots like those in aboriginal paintings, all competing for your attention." Houck's landscapes are more about pattern and color than land. Most important to her work is her powerful sense of design.

Houck is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design (BFA) and Tufts University/School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, (MA/MFA). Her work has been extensively exhibited in galleries and museums and she is widely published. Houck's pieces can be found in numerous collections including The Boston Company, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Fidelity Investments, the Fogg Art Museum, Coopers and Lybrand, and Massachusetts General Hospital to mention a few.

http://www.lisahouck.com/

painters     

Artist Statement

Frances Hamilton

Frances Hamilton is a painter and collage artist whose work has been exhibited widely in New England for over 25 years. Her images are intimate, rich in color and often inspired by memory and dream.

The Squam Lake Series is based on a lifetime of visits to a friend's summer home near Center Harbor, New Hampshire.

What might seem most familiar here is the sense of place, family and traditions created through the journeys back to a summer home. The overlay of time, spiritual regeneration, birth and death are all implied in the visible evidence of simple wooden tables and fishing gear. There is a paradoxically unchanged experience in the effects of many changing lives returning to a familiar and beloved setting. Squam Lake is renowned for families that have protected this culture of respectful return and the home which is fondly painted by the artist is one of many such shared campsites where the cultural archeology of past and present offers rich material for contemplation.

http://www.franceshamiltonart.com/

painters     

Artist Statement

Anne Garland

My art is a personal response to the natural world, where I have always found nourishment, inspiration, and joy. I use drawing, painting, and printmaking to visually express my intrigue in all that nature holds, each offering exciting and unique processes, tools and techniques. When painting, the landscape is most often my subject. I love being IN the landscape. The plein air process allows me to inhale all that surrounds me. At the end of a session, even if the painting is not completed, the experience of wading in the river, smelling and standing in the sweet field grasses, or sitting in patterned light of the woods is rewarding. When working in the studio, I am able to recall the landscape. Protected from the bugs and rain, I can work larger and longer, but it is not the same as being there. Through printmaking I enjoy exploring subjects that are more intimately seen, things I can manipulate in my hands, or extract from digital images and drawings. It is an exciting medium, offering endless possibilities in interpreting my intrigue with nature. For example, the thin and sensitive lines of an etching can suggest the fragility of a decaying leaf, while the boldness of a woodcut can convey the scuffling form of an armadillo rustling through the underbrush with it’s snout. Whatever medium or process I use, I am interested in letting the image evolve, becoming something unplanned and surprising in the process of trial, error, and patience.

Anne Garland's work is found in the following public collections: The New York Public Library, University of New England, The Portland Museum of Art, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Colby College Art Gallery, and The Farnsworth Museum of Art.
For the year 2010 she has earned The Pace House Residency in Stonington, ME awarded by the Maine College of Art, and she is the Buffalo National River Artist in Residence, Harrison, Arizona.
Her work is also contained in numerous private collections.

painters     

Artist Statement

Gay Freeborn

As a painter I have been searching, as we all do, for that which touches my heart. I have painted all of my life; from childhood horses, college figure drawing to images of those in distress, sad people, beautiful people, dogs and their people. I began breeding Labrador Retrievers on my farm in Maine and watching them, noticing their curves, their motion and their devotion, finally I have found an urgency to my brushstrokes that were not evident before. Using oils on canvas as my medium, I portray the dog with love for the animal as my driving force. The space that surrounds the subject is as important as the figure itself as they swirl, sit, sleep or stare back at me from the light engulfing them. The Dog, unconditional and unpretentious sits at my feet as I paint and I don't think I could ask for anything more.

painters     

Artist Statement

Kathryn Field

For the past 35 years I have divided my time between teaching, sculpture and painting. The newest body of paintings titled “Coming Home” is based on two years of travel in Australia and my reflections on returning home, to Sandwich NH. The focus is on a study of space.
I am drawn to shape first and then color in observing the landscape. This perspective comes from being a sculptor first and then a painter. The spaces between forms, hold as much interest as the forms themselves.
There is a way of seeing when you travel that is different from observing your normal daily routine. Your senses are heightened, your awareness is keener and you find richness in everyday tasks.
I traveled with sketchbook, camera and watercolors documenting my experience of space in multiple media basking in the luxury of sitting in stillness and observing the world.
I returned to Sandwich with a determination to stay centered on place and find delight in seeing and recording my familiar surroundings through the eyes of a traveler, as I had during my two year “Walk about” in Australia. The key is observation and gratitude for each day to see anew.
I also continuing to work on sculpture commissions and am in the process of designing and fabricating a large stainless steel Sculpture for Russell Sage College that will be dedicated October 20, 2016.

painters     

Artist Statement

Michael Doyle

Michael Doyle's landscapes are intimate renderings of rural scenes. The frames also fashioned by Doyle remind of antiquity while the work inside is contemporary in energy and execution. The work is rich and uplifting. It is peaceful. It asks to be remembered and revered. Doyle works in oil on canvas or board. He is a master of painterly technique with generous brushstrokes and ample paint. Working in both New Jersey and also New Hampshire, the paintings are a pleasant journey into Michael Doyle's world.

Doyle's work can be found in both private and corporate collections here and abroad. He has exhibited throughout the United States. He currently lives and works in New Jersey.

painters     

Artist Statement

Alston Conley

Alston "Stoney" Conley lives and works in Massachusetts and in Maine. Currently he is Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Fine Arts Department at Boston College. A career painter, Conley has taught and lectured in New England and in New York. He has been the recipient of many awards and distinctions for his work. His paintings are contained in both Museum and Corporate collections.

For many years Conley was interested in the fresco technique. Plaster is heavy, hard to move and easily damaged. He turned to painting on board, canvas and paper in oil and watercolor. His paintings reveal an interest in form and light. They are works done perhaps of the same scene at different times or the same time on different days. One becomes aware of the differences of the sky and nuance of the forms of trees at dawn or in the evening. Stoney's paintings echo a quiet reverence for their subject and spin an enchanting tale.

painters     

Artist Statement

Ashley Bullard

Ashley Bullard lives and works in New Hampshire. A graduate of the University of New Hampshire, Bullard's canvases demonstrate her passion for painting. Color and texture embue each painting with the energy the artist feels for her subject. Using the metaphor of her inspiration, the viewer is left to his or her her own conclusions. A talented artist, Bullard's work continues to grow in depth and execution. Her work can be found in both private and public collections throughout the United States.